Tuesday, October 23, 2007

Finishing the Unfinished Afghan

By Leigh

In August, I posted about finishing my (commercially) space dyed yarn afghan. (That post here.) Instead of fringing it, I decided that I wanted to crochet an edging all around. Finally, with cooler weather, I've gotten that done.

Completed space dyed yarn afghan.I decided on a simple closed shell edge, to compliment the zig zag effect of the twill treadling.

Close-up of crochet shell edging.1st row - American single crochet (double crochet in the UK) all around in solid blue (the same as the weft yarn).

2nd row - a shell row consisting of *5 American double crochets (UK trebles) in one stitch, skip 2 stitches, one US single, skip 2 more*, repeat from *.

For the shells, I used the space dyed warp yarn. I didn't figure out the corners till the last one, but oh well, who's gonna notice from a galloping horse?

Comparison of afghan front & back.I think that as a Christmas gift, this will be appreciated by the recipient. However, as an experiment in space dyed yarns, I'm not satisfied with the results. I tried to measure the color changes in bouts, but the commercial dye job was too inconsistent, so that the color changes aren't even and the effect is too stripy. So I reckon that leaves me with dyeing my own warps, which is an adventure I'll save for another time.

Posted 23 Oct. 2007 at http://leighsfiberjournal.blogspot.com

Related Posts:
More Space Dyed Twill Weaving
Space Dyed Twill Afghan

15 comments:

  1. Well Leigh, I like the colors and I think the blanket is lovely.

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  2. I used to love to crochet edging and had forgotten all about that. Once upon a time, all my pillowslips had personalized edgings. I had only heard your expression from my grandmother, only she said, "Who's going to notice that on a galloping horse." It's a great philosophy and allows much forgiveness. I'm *still* working on assigning tags - what a chore!!

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  3. Very nice! The shells really compliment the zigzags. Ho did you finish the warp ends to prepare them for the crocheting?

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  4. I love the crochet edge idea. Will have to remember that in the future. Very nicely done.

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  5. Beautiful!! How did you finish the "fringe" sides of the blanket so they could be crocheted?

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  6. What a gorgeous Afghan - and the crocheted edge is such a pretty touch. Someone is going to be very lucky at Christmas. :) [Also - you are putting the rest of us to shame with being so organised for the impending holiday season!]

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  7. Thank you for the compliments!

    In regards to finishing the cut edges in preparation for crocheting, originallly I planned to use my sewing machine to sew down the warp ends. However, my sewing machine is having tension issues so I ended up doing it all by hand. I found that I had to sew down 3 weft threads when I secured the warp, otherwise the weft wanted to unravel. It was a bit of a job, but the whole thing held together through machine washing and drying. After hand sewing, I did one row of single crochet all around and then the shells on top of that.

    Sharon, you might be interested to know that I learned that phrase from my grandmother too.

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  8. I like the effect of the crochet edging!

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  9. Lovely! The crochet shows off the variegation of the yarn and so gives a context for the woven area. The result is a whole entity where each part, edging, and weaving, support each other. I'm so glad you decided to do that.

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  10. Wouldn't have occured to me to do the crocheted edging...it's inspired! And quite lovely. Well done!

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  11. I love it Leigh and I'm certain whoever is lucky enough to receive it will too. Fringe often looks nice on a blanket, but when I'm using a blanket, I'd much rather not have fringe. I think your crocheted edging is just perfect!

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  12. In response to your comment on my blog:
    I love Shetland. I think it is THE wool for handspinners.
    Yeap, just vacuum it, actually the VM only falls into the basket (it might go into the vent but
    since I don't see it it's not there)
    The first time I tried it, I had the fleece in a mesh bag. It did not work obviously.
    I got this fleece 4 lbs unwashed heavily skirted for $24. So it is worth all the trouble and it
    really is not that big of a deal.
    Just make sure the wool is very dry. I have not tried it with damp wool but I don't think it is a
    good idea.....
    Good luck and let me know how it goes.

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  13. I think that your crochet edge is perfect for the Afghan. I like the stripe effect...

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  14. Some lucky person will be getting a beautiful Christmas present!

    I'm wondering what the fibre is though,I went back to your earlier post but don't think you have mentioned it, is it a wool yarn? Is it one that is sold as a weaving yarn? I'm getting more curious about the possibilities of different yarns and, frustratingly, I find most of the weaving books I have assume you will work yarns for yourself.

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  15. Sorry Dorothy! I forgot to mention that this is made from acrylic worsted weight knitting yarn. I've only made one wool afghan, for someone who won't mind hand washing!

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